Buffalo Bisons

History(1879-1885)

The original Buffalo Bisons baseball club played in the National League between 1879 and 1885. The Bisons played their games at Riverside Park (1879-83) and Olympic Park (1884-85).

This a list for the Buffalo Bisons that include year, managers, win/loss record, winning percentage, standing position, and games behind the leader.

Year Manager Game W L T WP PL GB
1879 John Clapp 79 46 32 1 .590 3 10.0
1880 Sam Crane 85 24 58 3 .293 7 42.0
1881 Jim O'Rourke 83 45 38 0 .542 3 10.5
1882 Jim O'Rourke 84 45 39 0 .536 3 10.0
1883 Jim O'Rourke 98 52 45 1 .536 5 10.5
1884 Jim O'Rourke 115 64 47 4 .577 3 19.5
1885 113 38 74 1 .339 7 49.0
Pud Galvin 25 7 18 0 .280
Jack Chapman 88 31 56 1 .357

Players of note

Dan Brouthers
Bill Crowley
Davy Force
Pud Galvin
Jim O'Rourke
Hardy Richardson
Jack Rowe
Deacon White

Season-Highlights

1877: A precursor to the Bisons played an independent schedule, finishing with a 79-28-3 record. The team would subsequently join the National League. [1]
1880: Pud Galvin pitched a no hit, no run game against Worcester
1881: Second baseman Davy Force recorded 12 putouts, seven assists, two unassisted double plays, participated in a triple play, and made just one error in 20 chances in a 12-inning game against Worcester, on September 15.
1882: Ireland-born Curry Foley became the first major league player ever to hit for the cycle (including a grand slam), on May 25, and Dan Brouthers led the National League with a .368 batting average
1883: Brouthers won his second consecutive NL batting title with a .374 average and Galvin posted 46 wins
1884: Brouthers hit triples in four consecutive games, set a season team-record with 14 home runs, and Galvin won 46 games for the second year in a row
1885: Brouthers hit .359, ending second in the NL batting race behind Roger Connor (.371)

History (1890)

The Buffalo Bisons of 1890 were a member of the short-lived Players League. This baseball team was managed by Jack Rowe and Jay Faatz, and they finished eighth (last) with a record of 36-96 while playing their home games at Olympic Park.

Hall of Famer Connie Mack was a catcher on this team, and he batted .266 in 123 games. It was his fifth season out of eleven as a major league player.

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